Insolita et stulta

The Enemy Of Archaeology Is Not People, It's Salt

archaeologicalnews:

image

The enemy of archeology everywhere is salt. It destroys buildings, disassembles art works, and can turn ancient pottery into piles of dust.

How salt lays waste to these artifacts is well known, but scientists in Switzerland have monitored the process in a laboratory. Their observations could…

redscharlach:

A Mighty Moments In Slash History Special: This Is Not A Pee-Pee

If you happen to find yourself standing stark naked in the middle of a painting, there are several things you can do to hide your family jewels. There’s strategic drapery, of course, and there are also strategic scabbards. In the absence of these, however, you may find yourself obliged to preserve your modesty with any old thing you can lay your mitts on.

Here, then, is a collection of some of the most random methods of groin coverage in art history. Please note: I do NOT recommend sallying forth in public with nothing to protect you but a rack of roast meat, a dove, a massive dragonfly, a cherub, an art teacher’s right hand, or the hairstyle of an unfortunate lady bystander. You may end up being arrested, and you’ll almost certainly find it tricky to get through doorways…

sushinfood:

justamerplwithabox:

vivelafat:

prokopetz:

officialdeadparrot:

grellholmes:

elsajeni:

gunslingerannie:

justtkeepcalmm:

dean-and-his-pie:

fororchestra:

musicalmelody:

Fun Story: My director kept telling me and my tenor sax buddy to play softer. No matter what we did, it wasn’t soft enough for him. So getting frustrated, I told my buddy “Dont play this time. Just fake it” 
Our Band Director then informed us we sounded perfect. 

To my readers: “p” means quiet, “pp” means really quiet. I’ve never seen “pppp” before haha.
On the contrast, “f” means loud, and “ffff” probably means so loud you go unconscious.

I had ffff in a piece once and my conductor told me to play as loudly as physically possible without falling off my chair…

Me and my trombone buddies had “ffff” and he sat next to me and played so hard that he fell out of his chair.
The lengths we go for music.

Okay yeah so I play the bass clarinet and the amount of air you have to move and the stiffness of the reed means it only has two settings and that is loud and louder, with an optional LOUDEST that includes a 50% probability of HORRIBLE CROAKING NOISE which is the bass equivalent of the ubiquitous clarinet shriek.

One day, when I was in concert band in high school, we got a new piece handed out for the first time, and there was a strange little commotion back in the tuba section — whispering, and pointing at something in the music, and swatting at each other’s hands all shhh don’t call attention to it. And although they did attract the attention of basically everyone else in the band, they managed to avoid being noticed by the band director, who gave us a few minutes to look over our parts and then said, “All right, let’s run through it up to section A.”
And here we are, cheerfully playing along, sounding reasonably competent — but everyone, when they have the attention to spare, is keeping an eye on the tuba players. They don’t come in for the first eight measures or so, and then when they do come in, what we see is:
[stifled giggling]
[reeeeeeally deep breath]
[COLOSSAL FOGHORN NOISE]
The entire band stops dead, in the cacophonous kind of way that a band stops when it hasn’t actually been cued to stop. The band director doesn’t even say anything, just looks straight back at the tubas and makes a helpless sort of why gesture.
In unison, the tuba players defend themselves: “THERE WERE FOUR F’S.”
FFFF is not really a rational dynamic marking for any instrument, but for the love of all that is holy why would you put it in a tuba part.

This is the best band post 
Everyone else go home

Oh man, so I play trombone, and we got this piece called Florentiner Marsch by Julius Fucik, and we saw this

which is 8 fortes. We were shocked until,

that is 24 fortes who the fuck does that

Who does that?

This guy. Take a good look - that is the moustache of a man with nothing to lose.

Julius IdontgivaFucik

More like Julius Fuckit


Pyrozod's tags for this were too hilarious not to share

sushinfood:

justamerplwithabox:

vivelafat:

prokopetz:

officialdeadparrot:

grellholmes:

elsajeni:

gunslingerannie:

justtkeepcalmm:

dean-and-his-pie:

fororchestra:

musicalmelody:

Fun Story: My director kept telling me and my tenor sax buddy to play softer. No matter what we did, it wasn’t soft enough for him. So getting frustrated, I told my buddy “Dont play this time. Just fake it” 

Our Band Director then informed us we sounded perfect. 

To my readers: “p” means quiet, “pp” means really quiet. I’ve never seen “pppp” before haha.

On the contrast, “f” means loud, and “ffff” probably means so loud you go unconscious.

I had ffff in a piece once and my conductor told me to play as loudly as physically possible without falling off my chair…

Me and my trombone buddies had “ffff” and he sat next to me and played so hard that he fell out of his chair.

The lengths we go for music.

Okay yeah so I play the bass clarinet and the amount of air you have to move and the stiffness of the reed means it only has two settings and that is loud and louder, with an optional LOUDEST that includes a 50% probability of HORRIBLE CROAKING NOISE which is the bass equivalent of the ubiquitous clarinet shriek.

One day, when I was in concert band in high school, we got a new piece handed out for the first time, and there was a strange little commotion back in the tuba section — whispering, and pointing at something in the music, and swatting at each other’s hands all shhh don’t call attention to it. And although they did attract the attention of basically everyone else in the band, they managed to avoid being noticed by the band director, who gave us a few minutes to look over our parts and then said, “All right, let’s run through it up to section A.”

And here we are, cheerfully playing along, sounding reasonably competent — but everyone, when they have the attention to spare, is keeping an eye on the tuba players. They don’t come in for the first eight measures or so, and then when they do come in, what we see is:

[stifled giggling]

[reeeeeeally deep breath]

[COLOSSAL FOGHORN NOISE]

The entire band stops dead, in the cacophonous kind of way that a band stops when it hasn’t actually been cued to stop. The band director doesn’t even say anything, just looks straight back at the tubas and makes a helpless sort of why gesture.

In unison, the tuba players defend themselves: “THERE WERE FOUR F’S.”

FFFF is not really a rational dynamic marking for any instrument, but for the love of all that is holy why would you put it in a tuba part.

This is the best band post 

Everyone else go home

Oh man, so I play trombone, and we got this piece called Florentiner Marsch by Julius Fucik, and we saw this

image

which is 8 fortes. We were shocked until,

image

that is 24 fortes who the fuck does that

Who does that?

This guy. Take a good look - that is the moustache of a man with nothing to lose.

Julius IdontgivaFucik

More like Julius Fuckit

Pyrozod's tags for this were too hilarious not to share

(Source: housecatincarnate, via todesart)

Anonymous asked: what conference are you attending? Lovely to hear that, I guess you'll be speaking there (if so, what about)? Sorry for being so nosy...

thatlittleegyptologist:

AELT 6 in London. It’s a conference solely dedicated to Ancient Egyptian linguistics. I won’t be speaking there this year unfortunately (I’ve not been in the right mind to put forward a paper) but I’m thinking that if it’s at Liverpool next year I might well do so. Of course this all hinges on my actually completing my doctorate to a decent standard! 

seeing the participants is really quite something. Personally, I have heard Martina Minas-Nerpel just a few weeks ago (and liked her lecture very much)… but I’m just starting out, so there’s still a long way to go until I get any degree :). Oh, and sorry about the anonymous ask (always forget to turn that add-on off). Best of luck, I’m sure you’ll do great on your doctorade!

Another free pattern 24 hour give away! Celebrate the arrival of Fall with the Enchanted Vines slouchy beanie. This beanie will be available for free until 7pm EDT (6pm Central). This is a cute Slouchie beanie that while contains many different design elements (lace, cable, and bobble) it is not that difficult at all! Great for beginners wanting a slight challenge and good for those more advanced wanting something enjoyable and quick to knit. 

Get it on Raverly now! Pattern

Knit to order on Etsy

(Source: arohaknits, via arohaknits)

philamuseum:

More Art Monday: Collection Travelogue

Ten works from our collection have accrued impressive travel miles en route to exhibitions in other museums. Learn about their journeys here, brought to you by ART 24/7.

The Burning of the Houses of Lords and Commons, October 16, 1834,” 1834–35, by Joseph Mallord William Turner
Exhibition: “Late Turner: Painting Set Free”
Location: Tate Britain, London, United Kingdom
On view: Now through January 25, 2015
Distance: 3,546 miles

Spring Sale at Bendel’s,” 1921, by Florine Stettheimer
Exhibition: “Florine Stettheimer“
Location: Städtische Galerie im Lenbachhaus, Munich, Germany
On view: Now through January 4, 2015
Distance: 4,116 miles

Basin, early 15th century, Xuande Period (1426–1435), Ming Dynasty (1368–1644), China
Exhibition: “Ming: 50 Years That Changed China”
Location: British Museum, London, United Kingdom
On view: Now through January 5, 2015
Distance: 3,546 miles

The Man of Sorrows (Christ Crowned with Thorns),” c. 1490, by Domenico Ghirlandaio
Exhibition: “Memling: Rinascimento Fiammingo”
Location: Scuderie del Quirinale, Rome, Italy
On view: October 11, 2014, to January 18, 2015
Distance: 4,366 miles

Marine,” 1866, by Gustave Courbet
Exhibition: “Gustave Courbet”
Location: Fondation Beyeler, Basel, Switzerland
On view: Now through January 18, 2015
Distance: 3,971 miles

The Papacy Offered to Saint Gregory the Great [?],” c. 1435, by Follower of Fra Angelico
Exhibition: “Fra Angelico, Botticelli: Rediscovered Masterpieces”
Location: Musée Condé/Domaine de Chantilly, Chantilly, France
On view: Now through January 4, 2015
Distance: 3,709 miles

Bacchus and Ariadne on the Isle of Naxos,” c. 1693, by Antoine Coypel
Exhibition: “Sensation and Sensuality: Rubens and His Legacy”
Location: Centre for Fine Arts, Brussels, Belgium
On view: Now through January 4, 2015
Distance: 3,744 miles

Purple and Rose: The Lange Leizen of the Six Marks,” 1864, by James Abbott McNeill Whistler
Exhibition: “James McNeill Whistler Retrospective”
Location: National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto, Japan
On view: Now through November 16, 2014 
Distance: 6,901 miles

Port of Le Havre,” 1874, by Claude Monet
Exhibition: “Impression Sunrise”
Location: Musée Marmottan Monet, Paris, France
On view: Now through January 18, 2015 
Distance: 3,709 miles

Follette,” 1890, by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec
Exhibition: “Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec—The Path to Modernism”
Location: Kunstforum Wien, Vienna, Austria
On view: October 16, 2014 through January 25, 2015 
Distance: 4,308 miles

finally got a decent sized yarn. only 8 g but that’s all for now.

finally got a decent sized yarn. only 8 g but that’s all for now.

new mitts - handspun wool and handknitted.

new mitts - handspun wool and handknitted.